Posts Tagged ‘sundays’

So the annual showcase at the Cineteca Nacional is over and that usually leaves me with an emotional void from the lack of that photogramme orgy that a bunch of films represent to my eyes. So it’s sad that yesterday I was watching Hannah Montana: The Movie with my dad on tv. Really REALLY sad.

I had the chance to see great films over the last weeks, films that are usually awarded in top European festivals and that may have a very slight chance to be distributed comercially.

Miss Kodak and I went to see the new Aki Kaurismäki film, Le Havre. After six years in hiatus, the most international Finn after Nokia brings us his classic Scandinavian cold humour, the almost unexpressive faces of the actors and a heart warming story without being corny. Kaurismäki’s fans (like me) will not be disappointed. In this film, shot in the harbour city of its title, an old shoe polisher helps a young illegal immigrant to reunite with his mother.

Argentinian and Brazilian cinemas are the best in Latinamerican. In general, their great quality is not only technical but also in the stories they depict and it is produced under very difficult conditions since budgets are not normally huge. This time, the Argentinian film El Hombre de al Lado (The Man Next Door) by Mariano Cohn and Gastón Duprat is about how a small neighbours’ incident grows and grows like a snow ball with a great and surprising twist in the end that will leave viewers thinking. It is a film that will not leave anyone indifferent. It is a great balance between the macabre and a very black sense of humour. The weight of the film lies on the two neighbours in dispute played by Daniel Aráoz and Rafael Spregelburd, a light-minded redneck and an obnoxious architect, respectively. In short: a remarkable film! Mexican cinema has still a LOT to learn from its Latinamerican neighbours.

It was not disapointing but Le Gamin au Vélo is not the best film by the Dardenne brothers. As usual, in the almost documentary style that characterises the Belgian fraternal duo of filmmakers, Cyril, a kid is abandoned by his father in a youth farm where he can have the chance to get a new family. A kindhearted hairdresser welcomes Cyril to her life to stay over the weekend where they will start to develop a mother-son bond that goes beyond the blood links. For the first time in their fiction work, they include music and a famous actress (Cécile de France) but the characters feel a little dumb whereas in their other films they are naïve and almost fighting in the wild to survive, most notably in Rosetta, 1999 Palme d’Or winner. As I told before, not their best film but still a good one.

Once upon a time in Anatolia is Turkish filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan‘s new film. Long takes inside cars with equally long conversations that reminded me of Abbas Kiarostami‘s certain film, this is like a CSI episode Turkish-style since an heterogenous group of policemen, a district attorney, militars, crime scene technicians and a mysterious doctor is lead by a couple of criminals who do not seem to remember where they buried another man after a drunk quarrel. This film reaches poetic heights with beatiful images and a stroy that needs the viewer’s commitment through his/her interpretation. Indeed an interesting film full with lyrical imagery, bucholical landscapes, nostalgic rainy weather and subtleties. Highly recommended.

Next Sunday, I’ll finish the review of the films seen last week and a reflection about the state of filmmaking in the world. Hey! iCarly is on! Oh my, how sad! Really sad!

Have a nice week and remember: in the cinema, the man who always has the final word is the guy who selles you pop-corn!

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Forgive me father for I have sinned! It’s been almost five years since my last confession. I haven’t been to the cinema as often as needed and I didn’t honour the filmmaking art for almost three years. Well, if you thought this was a religious post, in a way you’re right since for me cinema and the ritual of going to the movie theatre has been like a religion. I used to write some collaborations for the Mexican daily newpaper unomásuno and my last “confession” was on late 2006.

Anyway, for several reasons, Sundays for me have been the most boring days of the week during all my life: I don’t attend church, I don’t like sports (to watch or practice for that matter) and I don’t have a big family (so, there are no gatherings). It’s a day in limbo where I must be prepared for Monday but there are no other options.

The only interesting stuff that happened on Sundays when I was a child was the fact that when my grandfather – in the unlikely event there was no soccer match on tv- left the tv for us to watch, we (there used to be more Bunts back then) gathered around the only colour tv set in the house to watch film classics like Easter Parade, On the Town, Anchors Aweigh or That’s Entertainment!  just to name a few.  Paradoxically, to this date I don’t like musicals.

Going to the actual movie theatre was not an option since under her  judgemental stare, my grandmother prevented us from going since she considered that only on Sundays “the help” was attending cinemas. So I was pretty much stuck in that week limbo.

So in this column I will talk precisely about neglected films, cult classics that the world forgot, one or two surprises that got into the theatres for a week, the ever-changing transition cinema is facing and some other stuff about what’s happening in the Mexican movie scene and I am very happy to collaborate in this blog since back in my film journalism days at unomásuno, I needed to be more “objective” but now I can loose myself into subjectivity.

So I welcome you, the reader, to come back every now and then to see our twodopeboyz blog and comment, suggest or whatever it’s in you to share. This column is for you too.

Next week I’ll start formally with the first film I’ll review: Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. Not that neglected after all since it got the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes International Film Festival but you’ll see what I mean.

Have a great week and remember: in the cinema, the guy who has the final word is always the one who sells the pop-corn!

For the Spanish-speaking readers, these are almost all my collaborations in the past: